Frontier Diary 10/14 | PostIndependent.com
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Frontier Diary 10/14

Post Independent Writer

Photo Courtesy Frontier Historical SocietyThe attached photograph was taken in October 1901 after Chief Eggleston (center) was successfully defended by attorney Charles Darrow on game law violations. Two of Darrow’s children, Nicholas and Helen, are seen posing with Eggleston. Please give photo credit to the Frontier Historical Society. By Willa SoncartyRegistrar, Frontier Historical Society and MuseumAbout fourteen miles outside of Meeker, Game Warden Charles Fravert and several cowboys arrested eight Ute Indians. It was hunting season, October 1901. However, Warden Fravert was not impressed with what the three Ute women and five Ute men had in their possession. The two hundred deer hides strapped to the Utes’ thirty pack horses lead Fravert to believe, under Colorado game laws, that the Indians were involved in a large scale poaching operation. Fravert confiscated the hides, rifles and horses. He and his assistants then began the escort of the prisoners to Glenwood Springs for arraignment and trial.While on the road to Rifle, the women prisoners made a break for freedom. Fravert and the cowboys gave chase thinking that the male prisoners would stay in place. The men, however, ran for freedom in the opposite direction. Fravert and his assistants were only able to recapture an elderly man named Chief Eggleston. They also only retained twelve hides and two pack horses.Chief Eggleston was lodged in the Garfield County Jail. His imprisonment so outraged several Meeker residents that they hired for Eggleston the best local defense attorney possible. That attorney was Glenwood Springs resident Charles Darrow.Darrow wasted no time fashioning a defense. He argued the question of jurisdiction, noting that the crime, if it had been committed at all, occurred in Rio Blanco County and that the accused never had possession of the deer hides in Garfield County.Judge Hedden was persuaded by Darrow’s argument. He dismissed the case and ordered the return of Eggleston’s personal property and horses.After a brief stay in Glenwood Springs, Eggleston caught the first train to Rifle, eventually returning to his Meeker home. “Frontier Diary” is provided to the Post Independent by the Frontier Historical Society and Museum, 1001 Colorado Ave., Glenwood Springs. Winter hours are 1-4 p.m. Mondays, and Thursdays through Saturdays.”Frontier Diary” is provided to the Post Independent by the Frontier Historical Society and Museum, 1001 Colorado Ave., Glenwood Springs. Winter hours are 1-4 p.m. Mondays, and Thursdays through Saturdays.


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