Letter: ‘Floxxing’ us to death | PostIndependent.com

Letter: ‘Floxxing’ us to death

In 1991 our U.S. military sent 242,000 American troops to Kuwait to engage in project Desert Storm. There was anticipation that the operation would involve chemical warfare. As a precaution, all of the troops were given a protocol of 15,000 mg of Cipro to provide them with autoimmunal protection.

By the time the troops arrived in Kuwait, they were all so sick that the orders were issued to place them on another 10-day protocol of 15,000 mg of Cipro. The U.S. government had decided to supply post offices and all the military with Cipro to protect them from chemical attacks such as anthrax.

Many years went by drawing very little attention.

In July 2005, a 130-page document surfaced as a result of 4,500 cases of mental alterations and complications regarding the crippling of victims primarily in California including many professional athletes due to tendons breaking in their legs and cartilage dissolving in their feet. This is when the outrage began to explode about fluoroquinalone toxicity.

Immediately, the FDA was lobbied by organized groups from everywhere in the country. Persistence finally prevailed on July 8, 2008, when Cipro was "Black Boxed" by the FDA, which resulted in the mandating that the manufacturer which was (and still is) Bayer label the packaging to warn of potential threats of ingesting Cipro. Shortly thereafter, the U.S. government canceled a $3.2 billion annual contract with Bayer.

So, back to the U.S. troops. Between 1992 and 2008 an average of 34 of the Desert Storm deployed soldiers per month committed suicide. During the entire Iraq war campaign, we lost an average of 28 soldiers monthly during combat.

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Since the early 1990s, the fluoroquinalone nightmare began to spread to livestock production.

It was discovered that by introducing fluoroquinalones to the food supplies of bovine, swine, poultry and fish that all would grow faster and therefore reduce the time taken to mature before slaughtering. Tyson Foods slaughters 440,000 chickens every day at a facility in Arkansas alone. It used to take 84 days for a chicken to reach the weight needed to slaughter. Now it takes 41 days. The chickens don't even have feathers before they are slaughtered. The accepted label for this crisis is known as "floxxing."

There are now at least 12.5 million innocent people like myself who have been floxxed, and the numbers continue to increase. Levaquin and Cipro are still being prescribed by western medicine in spite of these known facts. Get a grip.

Dan Jervis