Letter: Mitsch Bush’s policies based on evidence, not ideology | PostIndependent.com

Letter: Mitsch Bush’s policies based on evidence, not ideology

For 25 years, I was a medical officer and senior leader at the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. That agency's ethos was simple: use the best scientific evidence to improve the health and well-being of all Americans. I believe that good government is possible, and spent my entire career working for an agency that believed so, too. But good government requires all three branches, and Congress hasn't been doing its part.
After I retired to western Colorado, I watched in horror as the 2016 election brought into power an anti-science administration. I contacted our Colorado elected officials to protest the appointments of health and education officials who are beholden to private interests, openly corrupt, and so unqualified for their jobs that their policies hurt the people of Colorado. Scott Tipton responded with form letters that ignored my specific and informed points of concern. He demonstrated his disinterest in representing me and in good government by prioritizing corporate donors over ethical, considered decision making.
Congress also is responsible for writing and passing the annual federal budget. In 25 years of service, I do not recall a year when we received our budget on time, and government shutdowns during my career caused enormous damage to CDC and other agencies. Mr. Tipton's votes, which led to government shutdowns, further demonstrate his sympathy to ideology instead of good governance.
We must elect a representative who will work to save, strengthen and empower our government institutions to do the important and science-based work they were established to do. Diane Mitsch Bush has a proven record of working across the aisle, for example: carefully shaping water policy that was supported by ranchers, farmers and conservationists. I'm voting for Diane Mitsch Bush because she will be a voice in Congress for policies based on evidence, not ideology.
Stephanie Zaza
President-Elect, American College of Preventive Medicine