Letter: Science in our politics | PostIndependent.com

Letter: Science in our politics

“The March for Science and Climate” is 1-4 p.m. Saturday in Paepcke Park, Aspen. Please consider attending.

People often misunderstand what science is, so I share astronomer Carl Sagan’s description to help.

“Science is more than a body of knowledge. It is a way of thinking; a way of skeptically interrogating the universe with a fine understanding of human fallibility. If we are not able to ask skeptical questions, to interrogate those who tell us that something is true, to be skeptical of those in authority, then, we are up for grabs for the next charlatan (political or religious) who comes rambling along.” (5/27/1996 Charlie Rose interview)

Science takes ideas, researches, tests, reports results and has others verify before acceptance. The results affect everyday life from Aspen ski lifts to the Glenwood Bridge to hydrofracking and everything else.

Political decisions affect our lives, too, and they may affect future generations even more. Political decisions are made for us, so I want decisions made using the best available information.

I cringe when elected and appointed representatives don’t use available science information for decisions. To me, it seems there is now a conscious effort to discount, deny or ignore science information, and preconceived ideas influence statements and decisions more than scientific data.

I hope you agree using valid scientific information to make decisions is a good idea.

If so,

• Attend the event (info booths, speakers and march). Show support for science, science research and science based decision-making, but attending is not enough.

• Contact your elected representatives. Tell them to support science research, science education and science-based decision making. These are vital to our future.

• Hold your elected officials accountable. Don’t let them make claims without documented evidence.

Remember, this is our lives, our children’s lives and the future we are creating. Do not settle for good enough.

Sam Schroyer

Carbondale