Letter: Excellent field trip | PostIndependent.com

Letter: Excellent field trip

Trajectory. We spend most of our parental life putting our kids on a trajectory for success. Success cannot be guaranteed, but we sacrifice and educate and show them through experience what a wonderful world they live in.

Glenwood Elementary School invited my volunteer wife and I on a field trip with third-graders to visit ACES and the Aspen Art Museum. Fifty children on a bus to Aspen is not for the faint of heart, but it is exciting and fun-filled with nonstop talking and laughing.

It is, though, a small price to pay to watch a great horned owl with its unusual neck vertebrae gulp down a dead mouse while the ACES naturalist explains the amazing ability of this animal with its incredible hearing and eyesight. The children are instructed on the value of wetlands by playing a game as if they are migrating fowl moving from one wetland to the next along their migratory path. They touch a trout to feel the protecting slime, and learn that the trout poop is critical to feeding the aquatic plants. After a great lecture on the life cycle of aquatic insects, they put on boots and with small nets seek out these strange but favored trout food.

After saying goodbye to the golden eagle who is permanently grounded because of a broken wing, we walk to the beautiful Art Museum and have lunch while looking out on Aspen Mountain. The children learn the Gallery Walk and then proceed to see the Bound and Unbound mixed media sculptures by Judith Scott. The young students are asked to explain what they see and they provide their interpretation. They are off to see a ceramic display by Liz Larner and again add their interpretation to what they see. They then watch a video by Rachel Rose who combines a conversation with an astronaut, various imagery and music to show how our experience of the “infinite” occurs through our very human limits.

Thank you third-grade teachers, ACES, the Aspen Art Museum and bus drivers for such positive trajectory.

Thomas Rutledge

Glenwood Springs


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