LETTER: Glenwood needs a bypass | PostIndependent.com

LETTER: Glenwood needs a bypass

Glenwood is like a peninsula in reverse. It can’t grow beyond the valley floor any more than a peninsula city can beyond the water. There are exceptions in both cases, but the point is Glenwood is, within its core, limited to its present population: about 10,000. It can never get beyond being a “mom and pop” mentality.

I live in Grand Junction where the cost of living, incomes, mentality, elevation, etc. are lower. The difference between these is critical mass. It is not in the government as much as it is in the volume of people and their needs. By default people are accommodated, and there is plenty of room.

Right now Glenwood is a funky little charmer … a “speed bump” on the way to Aspen. If anyone has the true power that the wealth of the American Dream implies, and really cared, they would embrace local concerns. They don’t; it’s short circuited when they hop on an airplane to go home. These folks only like “The Aspen Ambiance” (why address core concerns or be involved?). They bring their fun things to their fun houses and then go home. Aspen is a great “painted lady.”

So here is Glenwood timidly moving toward micromanaging handicap access to a new bridge … or not a new bridge … by default. There is no strategic concept. It’s been teased by the state and badgered by the powers that be in Glenwood, but it has no plan to overcome its gridlock or improve its future. Its roots are deeper than Aspen’s, but it can never compete with Grand Junction.

The obvious choice is a bypass that makes a clean interchange up the Roaring Fork to 23rd. The coolest would be a bridge that serves as a bypass/mall over Grand Avenue. Imagine getting some weak smattering of an elevator on a bridge to oblivion. To get things done in Glenwood, things have to be done smarter.

Fred Stewart

Grand Junction


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