Our challenge: Determining what truth is | PostIndependent.com

Our challenge: Determining what truth is

Ross Talbott
GPI-TalbottRoss-CMNM-mugjpg

When you read this column, stop and say, “Hey, this guy wrote this last year.”

How is that for an example of deception? It’s true, but as presented, it gives an altogether wrong impression.

Given the incredible amount of information and media with which we are continually flooded, sorting it all out becomes a real challenge.

We just went through special holidays and were subjected to a tsunami of advertising.

Advertising plays on your emotions. You are told that satisfaction and happiness results if you just drink the right beer or drive the right car.

Just call the right law firm and all your problems will be solved.

Many years ago, politicians would travel the country in a train. The train would stop in each town, and the candidate would give a speech from the platform on the last car.

Now the proliferation of newspapers, magazines, television and computers is inundating us with campaigning promotion.

The media, however, have their own agenda and manipulate information to support that position.

For instance, if a candidate is giving a speech, the reporter will take several pictures. If they like the candidate, they will select a picture to publish that makes them look strong and reliable. If they are not their choice they will pick a picture to publish where they caught the candidate looking goofy.

You know that works if you just review your family pictures.

My wife takes several pictures and then picks the best.

There are many other techniques used to promote agendas.

Location in the media is only one. What they like makes the front page.

What they don’t like gets buried on page 16 in small print with no pictures.

The heading on the article is also used to either attract your attention or cause you to skip over.

Timing is also a critical tactic.

Newspapers, television and all other print media spend a lot of time studying to determine which days most people read the media or what hours have the highest TV watching.

Businesses spend great amounts of money to advertise during football games.

Some days the newspapers carry lots of advertising, and some days they are really thin. That’s no accident.

One of the things I find most disgusting are the political cartoons.

For the most part they are totally dishonest in the way they characterize their target people or groups. Realizing that there are a wide range of cartoons for the media to print, you can quickly determine the publisher’s biases.

If they continually denigrate gun owners, you can rightly assume that they are anti Second Amendment.

Another problem with the media manipulation is how often they dwell on an issue.

Don’t you feel that some issues become the major focus day after day and others just drop out of sight?

You must realize that the foundational driving motivations are subscribers, advertising money, political influence and political favor.

We’ve just passed through the time of the year of the most incredible pressure to buy stuff.

I can’t believe that any other culture in history has ever experienced the commercial pressure we suffer with.

On the other hand no one else has ever enjoyed the luxury and abundance we enjoy.

The problem we have is controlling our impulses and resisting the temptation that is waved before us.

There is a large contingent of professionals who spend their time trying to deceive us and control our impulses and way of thinking.

They control our thinking with timing, location, colors, associations, emphasis, music, colors and a host of other techniques.

The challenge for us is determining what truth is really.

We need to separate our real needs from what others say we need.

Determine what has worked for our country and made us great.

Identify deception and reject it.

If you really want the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth, I challenge you to pick up the Holy Bible.

The stakes are really high.

“Out On A Limb” appears on the first Tuesday of the month. Ross L. Talbott lives in New Castle, where he is a business owner.


Start a dialogue, stay on topic and be civil.
If you don't follow the rules, your comment may be deleted.