Refuting German energy argument | PostIndependent.com

Refuting German energy argument

In Floyd Diemoz’s July 14 letter, he carefully outlines a Russian $95 million effort to oppose NG development. From there he draws a conclusion to ask, will Germany defend itself if most of their energy is supplied by that aggressor, and concludes: “Germany will surrender with the threat of the turn of a single gas valve.”

This is a well constructed argument, I would grant his structure of backgrounds because I could not find corroboration or denial, but most importantly I found an error greater than his “depth of the Grand Canyon” in his conclusion wind-up.

I can’t be sure if the staunch Republican in him was trying to defend his party’s president that lied about NATO, but it did parallel and try to create support of one of the “big lies” that came out.

His president was quoted that the pipeline was going to supply up to “maybe 70 percent of Germany’s energy.”

CNBC states [cnb.cx/2NWPcRh]: Trump is exaggerating Germany’s reliance on Russia for energy

• President Trump claimed Germany could soon rely on Russia for up to 70 percent of its energy.

• While Germany gets about half of its natural gas from Russia, the claim is highly misleading.

• Natural gas is a significant fuel source in Germany, but it only accounts for about 20 percent of Germany’s energy supply and consumption.

Now, stay with me.

1. Natural gas is not the dominant fuel source. It accounted for about 20 percent in availability and consumption of fuel. “Natural gas is just one of the fuels that powers Germany’s industry, households, power plants and vehicles. While natural gas plays a significant role in fueling Germany — especially in heating German homes — it’s hardly the dominant fuel source.” Not 50 percent, 60 percent or 70 percent, it is 20 percent! A long way from “most.”

2. Of the 20 percent, about half was imported from Russia and gas from the North Sea fields (Norway and Belgium) supplied the other half.

3. In the longer term, Germany is trying to generate most of its electrical power from renewable energy. The role natural gas will play past 2050 (as about 13.2 percent of imported gas is used for electrical power production) is dependent on how many other uses switch to the cheaper electrical for vehicles, households and industry.

4. Moreover, while usage of gas may go up some, its trend in the renewable change, has been downward.

5. U.S. LNG will never compete with the pricing of Russian gas. Even as the U.S. tries to establish Asian markets, Russians are building pipelines (like the Nord) undersea to Japan and down North Korea to South Korea.

What is actually happening is Russia and China are beating capitalism (U.S. variety) at their own game, and in this game Russia has already captured the opponent’s “king.” And the U.S. insists on killing the earth to milk profit of a product of the dead.

Bob Arrington,
Battlement Mesa


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