Thursday letters: Pandemic, pet waste, copper, Holy Cross, masks, health and safety, Boebert, and meat plant workers | PostIndependent.com
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Thursday letters: Pandemic, pet waste, copper, Holy Cross, masks, health and safety, Boebert, and meat plant workers

Pandemic could cause our society to reassess

Coronavirus is changing the world we live in. The virus is challenging our societies locally and globally. Almost 250,000 dead as of today. The majority of the deaths are seniors like me. So, I am watching the coverage closely. People like me may be on lockdown for a year of more. There are no therapies or vaccinations. I can’t take a chance on getting infected.

But in all the hours of coverage, almost nothing is said about climate change. A couple of stories were done on the lack of smog and cleanliness of waterways. The world is quieter; the birds can be heard singing. Wild animals are slipping into the edges of communities.

The reduction in transportation is the main cause of the change. People are “sheltering” and often working from home. Video conferencing has taken off. People are saying that reduction of fossil fuel burning could look like this. Yes, but this is only around a 5% reduction. The other 95% of emissions are still going into the atmosphere; still pushing up the amount of CO2 into the air; still increasing global warming.

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But this brief window looking at reduced emissions is wasted as the country pushes to go back to normal. A big part of “normal” is our entertainment. Watching professional sports is a big part of today’s entertainment. The poster child for a sport that stands as the opposite to reducing emissions is car racing. NASCAR will have seven races later this month. Not only will hundreds of thousands of people be driving to and from the events, but the event is about cars that burn huge amounts of gasoline going around in a circle. Does it really matter which of these cars finishes first?

These big events put money in the pockets of everybody that works for them, which is a good thing. But we can be sure that the coronavirus loves these events too.

This pandemic could cause our society to reassess and think of the different ways we could get to things we really need. Or we could just blow it on drinking beer, loud noise and waiting for the next car crashes.
Pat Hunter
Carbondale

Love Glenwood and Snoopy

As a 24 year resident , it’s hard to see the changes to our towns as I’m sure the older generations agree.

Amidst the changes of our times, as well as the pandemic, I’ve seen a beautiful side to our community. Connection, consideration, kindness and respect that a few weeks before all of this had been lost by many.

If one thing changes for the better, I hope it’s the desire to be more aware of others. What makes a strong community is being able to be different people but be respectful to one another. We are all bonded by the desire to love, be loved, obtain good health, wellbeing and happiness.

Since we’re in a momentous awareness of health in our society, I would like to draw attention to how unsanitary our parks/trails are everywhere I go. Our community loves dogs and the outdoors so maybe we can tie into being more mindful about stressing the consequences of littering and defecation.

I have two small children, and as I walk around town and through the parks I have to warn my kids of where they step literally, no joke, every two feet. I’ve picked up numerous dog poop piles right in the middle of our playgrounds. I’ve seen numerous beer cans/wine bottles, clothes, shoes, fast food bags, you name it just covering our valley from highways to neighborhoods.

As someone who’s worked with people and animals, I believe education, responsibility, sanitation and cleanliness paired with caring toward all sides and the following ideas could help us become more productive as a town:

Love Glenwood and Snoopy clean up your neighborhoods week, held throughout the year, getting our kids and cultures into caring for the Earth, animals and our community more locally, not just trail /mountain minded.

Enforce off-leash park rules, more communication /enforcement for picking up after pets and/or using the dog park dilgently, and/or more stray animal (control) code enforcement officials and/or tickets to those who aren’t following pick up after your dog rules.
I love Glenwood, I love my kids and my dogs. Let’s be honest though — who loves stepping in a big steaming pile, or even seeing how trashed our town has become?
Crystal McFarland
Glenwood Springs

Copper is known to kill germs

Going forward after the sickness shock that caused the recent business and economic downturns, it would be wise for American national and local businesses, offices, governments, nonprofit groups, homeowners and residential rental property owners to install copper door knobs, railings, interior sheets and other items to ward off and kill germs.

Copper is known to kill germs.

Also, one would hope that the mass transit systems would thoroughly clean their buses, trains, bus stops, train stops and terminals to improve public health.

Emzy Veazy III,
Aspen

Vote for DeGolia and Campbell in Holy Cross election

Despite the terrifying toll Covid is taking on our communities and economy, it’s important to remember other threats remain just as serious. Covid devastated Colorado’s winter economy by canceling the last two weeks in March, which is precisely what unchecked climate change will do. You can help prevent that from happening by voting in the Holy Cross election by mail-in ballot, helping your utility continue its remarkable progress expanding clean power through the region and demonstrating leadership for the nation. The two best candidates for the job are Alex DeGolia in the Western District, and David Campbell in the Northern District. Alex has a PhD in environmental management, served as a White House natural resources staffer, and now works on clean energy and climate strategy. https://www.alexforholycross.com/. Tesla-driving David Campbell http://www.Campbell4HCE.com brings a business and real estate background to the job. He supports clean energy development while keeping rates stable and modernizing the electricity grid. He has done his homework and run for this seat before.

Look for your ballot in the mail this week!

Auden Schendler
Basalt

Masks should be mandatory in grocery stores

On Friday, May 1, All Americans were being asked to exercise their right to strike against Congress and the Trump administration for ignoring the health and welfare of its citizens. All Americans should demand $2,000 per month with Medicare-for-All and paid sick leave. Millions of Americans will be without their jobs or no jobs for a long time. The economy has tanked and won’t come back for a long time as well. Don’t listen to Trump or Congress, because they will lie to all of us. It is mainly Trump and the Republicans in Congress that don’t want to give working Americans the stimulus checks or guaranteed income that they deserve. This strike should be every day until Americans get what they deserve.

Regarding going back to work. Citizens should not go back to work if they are not tested for the COVID-19 virus. All workplaces need non-contact digital thermometers to scan employees entering and leaving their job locations. Masks and social distancing still needs to be practiced at work, businesses, banks, post offices, and public transportation. COVID-19 virus cases will not go down or go away unless these guidelines are observed by everyone.

While we are all at home these days, please protect our food supply. Why are customers not wearing masks going into our local grocery stores such as City Market and other food establishments? It should be mandatory that customers wear masks into grocery stores. Also, grocery stores should install plastic shields or covers over and around the produce. Plastic lids over each produce section would be more sanitary and more energy efficient.

The rule should be: No mask. No service! The stores can provide masks if customers don’t have them. Wearing a mask is not that hard to do even for a few minutes. This should be the new normal until this monster virus goes away.

Randy Fricke
New Castle

Prioritize our health and safety by halting fossil fuel activities

It is a well-known fact, that hospitals around the globe are confronted with a shortage of respirators, required for severe COVID-19 patients to sustain life. However, it is not widely known that Colorado’s air pollution can increase our vulnerability to the COVID-19 respiratory pandemic.

Protecting the air we breathe, prioritizing public heath and safety, and potentially saving lives, not only during the COVID-19 pandemic, but every day, should be a top priority of all businesses. Pollution of soils, water and air put us all at increased risk and oil and gas activities are responsible for as much as 40% of the pollution in Colorado. In fact our state’s air pollution levels are frequently in violation of air quality laws, additionally citizens living in close proximity to oil and gas production are breathing in toxins that have resulted in spiked levels of cancer, respiratory disease, and increased risk for permanent lung damage or death.

Despite health and safety logic and the current surplus/diminished value of oil in our country, new fracking permits continue to be approved by the Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (COGCC) and pollution from fossil fuel activities has continued unabated. Additionally, on March 25, 2020 the COGCC announced that it is temporarily pausing the rule-making process under Senate Bill 19-181 that required them to make new rules to prioritize public health and safety over drilling.

Now is the time to protect the air we breathe – it is a priceless gift that sustains all life. Let us prioritize our health and safety by halting fossil fuel activities until the pandemic is contained and the legally required rule-making process is complete. I urge Gov. Jared Polis and the COGCC to stop, take a breath and contemplate the consequences of their decisions… Do you knowingly continue to violate Colorado’s air quality laws putting millions at increased risk in the face of the COVID -19 pandemic, or step up and protect the air we breathe?

Michelle Williams,
Carbondale

Boebert has every box checked off

When Lauren Boebert stood up to Beto O’Rourke in Aurora, I couldn’t believe it! This 5 foot, 100 pound woman facing down a presidential candidate that had said “hell yes, we are taking your guns!” She was surrounded by an anti-gun crowd, without fear, while declaring “hell no, you’re not!” I was astounded.

As a mom myself, I was even more excited to see this fiery mother of four boys is now stepping up to serve our Western Slope by running for Congress.

I recently learned that Boebert was a main contributor in collecting signatures to get the National Popular Vote on the ballot for the people to repeal it. Every box I have is checked off.

Do you believe in term limits? The current Congressman has been there for 10 years. We still have the same water issues. We have moved away from our energy independence to Green New Deal policies and less freedom throughout our Western Slope as a whole. We need new representation. Lauren is younger, a breath of fresh air, committed to our Constitution and owns a successful business to boot!

All the qualities that an Independent like me, is looking for.

Patty Murray
Silt

A path to good health

I have an idea. Instead of forcing the meat packing plant workers to risk their lives going back to work, why doesn’t the Food and Drug Administration coordinate efforts between the farmers, who are letting their produce go to rot in the fields because the restaurants and schools are closed, and the food banks, that are running out of food?

I know the free market types don’t want the government involved in anything that might benefit the people, but that way the meat plant workers can avoid infection and those without the means to afford food can eat a healthy vegan diet. Win! Win!

Fred Malo Jr.
Carbondale


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