Whiting column: 19 resolutions for 2019, here and at large | PostIndependent.com

Whiting column: 19 resolutions for 2019, here and at large

Bryan Whiting
Personal Responsibility

Our country needs new year’s resolutions as much as we do. This year, they seem especially appropriate.

It’s our responsibility to look beyond our personal interests to determine beneficial goals we should not only identify, but promote and implement.

At the macro level, the following would be of value:

1. The Federal Reserve Bank to realize that keeping inflation manageable isn’t most efficiently accomplished by increasing interest rates, but by lowering them. Higher interest rates decrease borrowing by business more than consumers. Lower interest rates would facilitate new startups and the resulting increased competition will automatically decrease consumer prices.

2. For each of us to do something specific for the good of the country. Examples include not spending money in a foreign country, to speaking up when someone badmouths the United States and its principles; actively supporting our military, to choosing an issue to overtly support. In regard to the military, those of us who are not actively defending our country have a greater responsibility to do our part for the country.

3. To actively celebrate the person who had the will power to say “no” and consequently not become an addict, as much as we rejoice in the person who has the will power to recover.

4. To have our national broadcast and print reporters return to their original mission of reporting, instead of interpreting and editorializing. Give us the facts. We are capable enough to understand and form our own opinions.

5. To have a majority of our politicians choose to not solely vote party line.

6. For there to be a change in behavior such that there aren’t any new #MeToo instances.

7. For us to stop focusing on the climate change debate and implement strategies that reduce pollution. Regardless of whether global warming/climate change are occurring in a geologically significant amount or pace, reducing pollution will benefit everyone.

8. For more of our multi-millionaire athletes and movie stars to follow the lead of Tiger Woods and LeBron James. Both have built and are funding an entire school. One can only imagine the positive effect a million dollar donation could have on a local public school.

9. For the government, insurance companies and the medical community to equalize the cost of medical insurance with not only the Western Slope and Front Range, but the states east of the Mississippi. There is an argument to be made that our rates should actually be lowest since most on the Western Slope possess a healthier lifestyle than our urban neighbors.

10. That the 2020 political campaigns and the requisite ads actually not begin until 2020.

11. For the same concept to apply to the start of holiday promotions. The first Christmas ad occurred at the same time as Halloween ads. A local store today was replacing Christmas products with Valentine’s Day.

At a more micro level, the following would be of value:

12. For the state to facilitate the economic recovery and growth that has returned to the Front Range to make its way to the Western Slope and the rural areas of Colorado.

13. Let the people use facilities for which they have paid. Most of our city, county, state and federal buildings have employee parking lots, paid for by tax dollars. Yet, we can’t park there. They need parking, but so do employees and customers of private business. It would be more equitable to allow daily public parking at those lots; first come, first served.

14. Do what is economically and behaviorally necessary to not be a burden on others.

Examples include the son/daughter making behavioral decisions that don’t cause their parents heartache to parents saving for their retirement so not to create an economic burden on these same children to fully utilizing universally provided educational opportunities in order to be employed and not require governmental or public assistance

15. Make raising children our No. 1 responsibility, even when it’s inconvenient or requires our spending money and time on them instead of ourselves.

16. Buy at least one product locally that we were going to buy online or in another town.

By spending $1,000 on a new TV here, it’s as valuable economically as a tourist visiting and spending $1,000. The same is true for the $100 spent in a local clothing store rather than Amazon. Beyond the economic value, look at the lists of those sponsoring local activities, silent auctions and charities. Over 90 percent of them are businesses owned locally, not national corporations.

17. Actively participate in at least one civic group or activity. Volunteer your time. It is often easier to donate money, but your time is more valuable and meaningful. A viable community requires everyone’s combined efforts.

18. For big snow to continue. It provides water in our rivers and discourages wildfires. It facilitates economic prosperity for Sunlight. The presence of an affordable, local area is an attribute for our community and our kids. However, as March and April arrive, it’s OK for the snow on the tops of mountains and not in my driveway.

19. For John Elway to find both an effective coach and quarterback.

It is to each of our personal benefits to do our part toward the realization of these resolutions.

Bryan Whiting feels most of our issues are best solved by personal responsibility and an understanding of non-partisan economics rather than by government intervention. He recently retired after 40 years of teaching marketing, entrepreneurship and economics. Comments and column suggestions to: bwpersonalresponsibility@gmail.com