Elections, coins, and home field advantage | PostIndependent.com

Elections, coins, and home field advantage

Casper's Corner
Jeff Caspersen
Post Independent
Glenwood Springs, CO Colorado

Watching CNN on Election Morning, I saw a viewer-submitted video chronicling how one woman determined who would receive her vote for president.

She flipped a coin.

Heads for Obama. Tails for McCain.

She flipped heads. (Just like the darn liberal media, quarters are clearly in the tank for Obama!)

Once I got over the absurdity of this lady’s decision-making process, I remembered something. This is one way the Colorado High School Activities Association (CHSAA) decides who hosts post-first round football playoff games in Class 2A and below.

Well, sort of.

Coin flips are actually determinant No. 2 in that process. The first determinant in figuring who hosts playoff contests is which school has hosted more playoff games. If your team’s been at home more times than the opponent, you’re packing your bags and hitting the road.

What happens if each team has hosted the same number of games?

In Classes 3A through 5A, the better-seeded team hosts. Fair enough.

In Classes 2A and below, the winner of a coin flip hosts.

Huh? Whatever happened to basing this sort of thing on merit?

If you go 10-0 and land a No. 1 or 2 seed, you’ve earned the right to play on your home turf throughout the playoffs.

Take Glenwood Springs, for example. The Demons went 10-0 and knocked off four ranked teams in securing the 3A classification’s top playoff seed. But, should the Demons knock off Roosevelt in the first round of the playoffs, there’s a 50-50 chance they’ll be traveling in the second round. Should Glenwood win and No. 9 Berthoud beat No. 8 Centaurus, the Demons would head to Berthoud.

Why? Only because Berthoud was on the road for its opener.

I just can’t comprehend the reasoning behind this system. If you’re worried about certain schools having to travel too much, then just hold playoff games at neutral sites.

That makes more sense than basing home designations on who’s played more games on their own turf or, worse, on the toss of a coin.

That’s as crazy as basing your presidential vote on, well, a coin flip.


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