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GLENWOOD ART CENTER RESTORATION INCLUDES ENERGY EFFICIENCY

After standing idle for more than four years, the Glenwood Springs Community Art Center is coming back to life. Art classes and pottery nights have quietly resumed, and a grand opening is set for June 4.

Putting the old hydroelectric building back into service has been a major project for the City of Glenwood Springs – and Garfield Clean Energy has played a supporting role, advising on opportunities for incorporating energy efficiency into the restoration.

Work started last year with the repair of water damage and other problems to bring the historic building into compliance with safety codes. Air conditioning also had to be installed to make the upstairs habitable for the city’s parks and recreation department to move into.

Photo courtesy of Glenwood Art Center
Photo courtesy of Glenwood Art Center

A chance encounter brought GCE into the process this winter. Heidi McCullough, a buildings specialist with CLEER – the nonprofit that runs GCE’s programs – is also a potter. She called the rec department to find out if they had any pottery studio space available.

They didn’t (yet), but they were quite interested in picking the brain of a buildings specialist.

McCullough offered to do an energy audit of the building, which is a free service Garfield Clean Energy provides to any commercial property owner in the county. As a member of GCE, Glenwood Springs also gets free energy consulting.

“Getting free information is an amazing thing,” says Matt Kraemer, the rec department’s facilities manager. McCullough’s audit was a “triple whammy” – the report provided a menu of immediate cost-saving fixes, other measures that could be rolled into the planned renovations, and additional improvements that could be prioritized as funding allows.

“I would encourage other municipalities to take advantage of the free audit and to start the conversation” about energy efficiency before undertaking any big renovations, Kraemer says. “You don’t know what’s going on (in the building) until you look into it.”

Here’s an example of not knowing what you don’t know:

In February, McCullough, Kraemer and others from the rec department and Black Hills Energy did a site visit of the arts center. While there, they noticed the indoor temperature seemed awfully warm – 73 degrees. They checked the thermostat and found it was set for 55. Something was awry. And then the air conditioning came on!

It turns out there was a faulty zone valve that wasn’t allowing the heat to shut off. It was the kind of glitch that happens from time to time, made worse by not turning off the AC for the winter. In an occupied building, the problem would have been noticed and corrected right away. In the arts center, no one noticed that the heating and cooling systems were battling with each other through the coldest months of the year, wasting thousands of dollars worth of electricity and natural gas.

Photo courtesy of Glenwood Art Center
Photo courtesy of Glenwood Art Center

“That was a quick fix that they alerted us to,” says Kraemer. The valve has been repaired, and all thermostats are being replaced.

Other low-hanging opportunities that the team has addressed include wrapping exposed pipes (which waste heat while also adding to the AC load), servicing the boiler and swapping out almost all of the old-style lighting with LEDs.

Kraemer says the city has included “pretty much all” of McCullough’s other recommendations in a $2 million grant request it recently submitted to the federal Department of Housing and Urban Development. The city is also applying for historic preservation grants.

“It’s about picking your battles with your own money and hoping for a little help to fund the bigger items,” he says.

Renovations are more complicated and expensive in a building that’s listed on the National Historic Register. That makes it all the more important to make energy-efficiency upgrades part of an integrated package of building envelope upgrades, Kraemer explains. For example, it makes sense to add insulation in conjunction with needed roof repairs. Air sealing is best done after windows are replaced.

McCullough has high hopes for two particular upgrades. One is replacing the glass-paneled roll-up garage door in the building’s newer wing, which she calls “an energy disaster – it’s like a hole in the wall, insulation-wise.” Kraemer says he’s getting a quote on a replacement product that would boost the door’s insulation value from R-2 to R-17.

The other is adding storm windows to augment the building’s old single-pane windows. The structure’s historic status greatly limits the kinds of changes that can be made to windows, but McCullough has found an interior storm window product that she thinks will be allowed.

The attic insulation, air sealing, super-insulated garage door, storm windows and a new, efficient boiler would all be funded by the HUD grant, if received.

Kraemer stresses that the city wants to prioritize energy efficiency in all its facilities.

“Anytime we do upgrades, that pops to the top of the list,” he says. “Not just in this building – it’s taking a deeper dive into every single building we have, seeing how we can be more green and energy-efficient.”

Explore 10 Iconic High Country Courses with the Rocky Mountain Golf Card

Golfing allows you to enjoy the best of Colorado’s natural beauty, all while playing a challenging game with friends and family. 

The Rocky Mountain Golf Card helps you make the most of mountain summers. It gives you two-for-one access to the best mountain golf courses in Colorado.

The 2022 Rocky Mountain Golf Card returns this season with 10 iconic golf courses in the Colorado High Country. 

For just $79, you and your partner play for the price of one at all 10 golf courses. 

This Rocky Mountain golf card lets you experience the variety of challenges, scenery and restaurants that the best mountain golf courses in Colorado offer. 

With the Rocky Mountain golf card, golfing in the Colorado mountains has never been easier — or less expensive. Each card can save you up to $860. 

Simply reserve a tee time at any of the participating courses, pay one greens fee and bring a companion, who plays free. Each 2022 Rocky Mountain Golf Card entitles you to one BOGO-free round of golf at every one of the 10 participating Colorado mountain golf courses. If you plan on golfing a few resorts more than once, simply purchase a Rocky Mountain golf card for the best deal. 

“My husband and I purchased two cards from you. We used them all the time and want to thank you for offering this to us. It gave us the opportunity to try many different courses in our beautiful Colorado,” Kathy, a Denver resident, said.

Elevate your summer — and golf game — with free rounds at the following Colorado mountain golf courses:

Cedar Ridges Golf Course

Escape the hustle and bustle of it all at Cedar Ridges Golf Course. Located on the outskirts of Rangely, this course sits atop sweeping mesas. The 9-hole, par-36 course leads golfers through large rolling hills and greens, water and sand traps and evergreens. 

Frank Hummel, who has created over 200 courses throughout the United States, designed the course. It offers a minimum of three tee boxes on each hole, making the course challenging enough for any experienced golfer, yet thoroughly enjoyable for novices, as well. 

Don’t miss this hidden gem on the Western Slope. The course is always in immaculate condition and provides a nice pro shop and restaurant. 

“I was extremely impressed with this beautiful course in such a small, remote rural town,” Margaret, a golfer, said. “It’s worth the drive.”

(photo courtesy of Jeff Affleck)
(photo courtesy of Jeff Affleck)

Eagle Ranch Golf Club

Eagle Ranch Golf Club combines top-notch service, exquisite conditioning and an Arnold Palmer Signature Design within the spectacular setting of the Rocky Mountains. 

“What makes it unique to other mountain courses is that you’re still in the mountains with scenic views, but the course is on a flatter piece of land,” said general manager Jeff Boyer. “The most common compliments we get are about the design of the golf course. It plays more fair. It’s not an easy golf course by any means. It’s very challenging, but what you see is what you get. There are no funky bounces or hard to judge (holes).”

The club also welcomes families and kids; the fact that so many people ride their bikes to golf is a testament to its neighborhood warmth.

“It has the characteristics of a higher-end, private course, but it doesn’t have that pretentious atmosphere. It’s friendly, relaxed and welcoming to all,” Boyer said.

(photo courtesy of Glenwood Springs)
(photo courtesy of Glenwood Springs)

Glenwood Springs Golf Club

Voted best 9-hole public course in Colorado by the Denver Post, Glenwood Springs Golf Club is set against a breathtaking backdrop of surrounding mountains and valleys. 

The par-35 course features tree-lined fairways and meticulously manicured greens. Bends and turns on green #5 make it the most challenging to navigate, while #8 makes a hole-in-one the most exciting because you can see the ball soar the entire way.

“The other greens on our par threes are elevated and intriguing,” said general manager Jerry Butler. “Having won the award of Colorado’s number one 9-hole golf course (in 2018), you will be pleasantly surprised by its challenging greens. What you will like most about this club is the people. They are small-town friendly, and everyone will make you feel like you are at home.”

Rollingstone Ranch Golf Club

With a sporty Robert Trent Jones II layout, plenty of wildlife, gorgeous mountain scenery and superb greens, it’s no wonder Golf Digest named Rollingstone Ranch Golf Club at the Sheraton Steamboat Resort one of the best places in Colorado.  

“The course has a great mix of holes where precision is key, but at the same time you can pull driver and let it rip,” said Andrew Donner, director of golf. “Elevation changes are abundant but not extreme. The aspens frame up the golf course perfectly, and with Fish Creek meandering in and out, eye-popping golf shots are plenty.”

In addition, the sound of the roaring creek, the crackling of wood as a deer wanders by, the whistle of a marmot in the distance or a moose swimming across the pond are just standard “distractions” while golfing at the club, he said. “It doesn’t hurt that it is 80 degrees and sunny almost every day.”

Yampa Valley Golf Course

Lined by the lazy Yampa River, Yampa Valley Golf Course weaves through more than 240 acres of cottonwood trees, wetlands, native grasses and sages. 

Located in the heart of northwest Colorado, rolling hills create a gorgeous backdrop at this 18-hole course. 

As the oldest and most affordable facility in the Yampa Valley, the team’s mission is to provide a quality golfing experience wrapped in a friendly and welcoming atmosphere. The experienced, well-trained staff treats everyone like family and delivers outstanding service on its meticulously maintained course.

“(It has a) wonderful staff, beautiful course and some of the best views in the valley,” golfer Andrea Lyn Green posted on Facebook.

Golfer Tom Atkinson, who plays the course annually, aptly describes it as “a fun and unique golf experience.”

(photo courtesy of Haymaker Golf Course)
(photo courtesy of Haymaker Golf Course)

Haymaker Golf Course

What makes Haymaker Golf Course unique is the fact that it’s a traditional, links-style course, located in the middle of the Rocky Mountains. Mount Werner’s snow-capped peak frames many of the holes, while the picturesque Flat Top Mountain Range surrounds the course. Native grasses and wetlands enhance wide-open fairways, and the golf course has earned Audubon International’s Highest Distinction for maintaining the utmost environmental standards. This extraordinary preservation makes the area a great place to spot elk, eagles, blue herons and other wildlife.

Designed by Keith Foster, seven sets of tee boxes allow for play ranging from 7,300 yards to about 5,000.

“It’s a really great layout for every type of golfer,” said head golf professional Cody Hasten.

Meeker Golf Course

Tucked away in the quaint community of Meeker, the 9-hole Meeker Golf Course 

is a small and compact course full of character. Designed by Henry Hughes, it’s surrounded by mountains and livestock pastures. Wildlife is abundant, and it’s not uncommon to see a deer lying on a green.

“The atmosphere is just very casual,” said manager Becky Ridings. “It has the feel of a small-town course. It’s less uptight — no one is rushing you, so people just relax and feel more comfortable.”

“(It’s) a hidden gem, very picturesque,” wrote golfer Mark Tomlinson on Facebook. “The price is good, and (it has) very friendly staff and owners.”

Hole #5 can be the most challenging for golfers new to the course, since doglegs and trees obscure the hole from the men’s tee box. Ridings’ tip: As you go up over #3, look at #5 to get a sense of its layout.

(photo courtesy of Ranch at Roaring Forks)
(photo courtesy of Ranch at Roaring Forks)

Ranch at Roaring Fork Golf Course

Set against a picturesque scene of Roaring Fork Valley’s mountains, the Ranch at Roaring Fork Golf Course offers a well-kept 9-hole, par-3 course. Its authentic Colorado neighborhood vibe makes it perfect for all skill levels and ages, from beginners to scratch golfers.

As the first golf course in Carbondale, the Ranch at Roaring Fork prides itself on being family friendly and community oriented. Its challenging fairways, chipping and putting greens make it a great place to perfect your short game or just spend leisurely time with family and friends. 

Golfer Kevin Blanchard calls it a “fun quick nine before work, (with a) friendly accommodating staff.”

The course’s easy access from Highway 82 makes it simple to slide into almost any schedule. 

“This summer, escape the ordinary and breathe in the fresh mountain air as you golf in Colorado’s stunning Rocky Mountains.”

Raven Golf Club at Three Peaks

Considered one of the top courses in the nation by Golf Magazine, golfing at Raven Golf Club at Three Peaks is truly memorable. It features lush, rolling fairways and immaculate greens surrounded by pines, aspens and snow-capped, 13,000-foot mountain peaks. Crystal-clear creeks and lakes punctuate the award-winning course. 

“The Raven Golf Club sits at 9,000 feet in elevation and boasts a 225-foot drop from tee to green at the par 9th hole,” said general manager Ryan Parr. 

While the course is open to the public, it also has the fastest growing golf membership in Summit County, increasing by 115% in the last three years. 

With a full bunker renovation of all 88 bunkers, high-end, white sand in traps contrasts the blue sky and emerald greens.

Rifle Creek Golf Course

Nestled along the Grand Hogback Ridge, Rifle Creek Golf Course provides a unique golfing experience with two distinct 9-hole tracks. Its friendly and expert staff aim to make your golf day a memorable experience — and the views themselves are unforgettable!

This year, golfers voted Rifle Creek #8 in Golfers’ Choice courses in Colorado, as well as one of the top 25 courses in the nation.

“This is one of the best values in the area and the course and all the surrounding views are fantastic — especially the back nine,” commented Golfers’ Choice golfer Captainbadger. 

The open front nine holes weave across the sparkling Rifle Creek, offering a fairly easy walk. The back nine winds through rolling hills with elevated tee boxes. It’s challenging, and provides spectacular mountain views. In addition, its large pro shop has one of the largest selections of clubs, clothing and accessories on the Western Slope.

Rocky Mountain Golf Card

Buy one round and get your partner’s round free: At just $79, it’s your pass to play more — and to save up to $860 this summer.

Quantities are limited, so purchase your pass today at:

Postindependent.com/golfcard

The 2022 Rocky Mountain Golf Card provides free access for golf partners at some of the best mountain golf courses in Colorado.  

This summer, escape the ordinary and breathe in the fresh mountain air as you golf in Colorado’s stunning Rocky Mountains. Every one of the 10 iconic courses on the 2022 Rocky Mountain Golf Card offers a different and invigorating experience to shake up your outdoor recreation routine and add more adventure to your season.

Hunger doesn’t have to be a secret

(photo courtesy of SANA, Safe and Abundant Nutrition Alliance )
(photo courtesy of SANA, Safe and Abundant Nutrition Alliance )

How many times have you gone to bed thinking about how you are going to provide the next day’s food for your children and for your family? It seems incredible that in such a rich valley there is a lack of food.

That is why SANA (Safe and Abundant Nutrition Alliance) is working on the secret recipe which is to remove the stigma to ask for help, since many people might be embarrassed to go to a food bank.

“I know it’s not easy for some people, but I would advise those who feel ashamed that having a need — material or spiritual — is part of the human condition,” explained Gladys, a SANA volunteer. “Therefore, it is more important to supply than stop to think about what others will think.”

(photo courtesy of SANA, Safe and Abundant Nutrition Alliance )
(photo courtesy of SANA, Safe and Abundant Nutrition Alliance )

Access to healthy food is the purpose behind the campaign’s goal, which is “hunger doesn’t have to be a secret”. Since it is not only talking about the subject, it is also creating solutions, listening to residents and sharing information between entities that can make changes in the system.

“Anyone can be vulnerable and fortunately there is support from local organizations and volunteers who give me the empathy to be able to approach the food banks,” explained another volunteer.

The beauty of this program is that it offers more than a simple flyer of food bank or distribution center hours. SANA also shares other resources, including healthy cooking classes and cooking recipes on how to best use canned food.

(photo courtesy of SANA, Safe and Abundant Nutrition Alliance )
(photo courtesy of SANA, Safe and Abundant Nutrition Alliance )

Like any community project, volunteers are what make everything possible, so if you have the time to help, please don’t hesitate to do so. But above all, if you have any need due to lack of food – whether you are sick, lack transportation or money – SANA can still help you connect with the right people. Find the SANA page on Facebook and send them a message.

A well-known saying says that we are arrieros and we walk on the road, at some time we all have had to go hungry, for whatever reason. But when there are solutions it is better to learn to seek help. Today for you, tomorrow for me. As good Latinos, where one eats, we all eat!

5Point Film Festival returns in person

Brought to you by 5Point Film Festival 

Once again, 5Point Film Festival is fostering a sense of community through a shared love of the outdoors.
While the festival went virtual during the pandemic, it’s back and stronger than ever this year, featuring a lineup of 56 short and feature-length films. 

“It’s so important to reconnect the audience and the community through the in-person festival. It’s our biggest priority,” said Luis Yllanes, executive director of 5Point Film Festival. “The magic that makes this organization so special is the ability to connect and gather in person.” 

Professional climber Beth Rodden tackling a boulder problem in Yosemite. She is featured in the 5Point premiere of This Is Beth. (photo courtesy of Tara Kerzhner)
resizedThisisBeth_Still03_TaraKerzhner-1

INSPIRATION THROUGH CONNECTION 

The four-day film festival focuses on inspiring audiences through outdoor films, panel discussions, art, music, food, and activities, like a fly-casting competition, bike ride and run and hike event. Over 50 special guests, featuring filmmakers and their subjects to writers and athletes, will attend the festival. 

The festival offers just about something for everyone, from young and older filmmakers to families, nature lovers and af- ter-party revelers. 

It all kicks off Thursday April 21 with the Van Life Rally featuring tricked- out adventure vehicles, live music and food trucks, late night tacos and more. 

Free panels and workshops encompass a variety of topics, from increasing diver- sity in outdoor films to balancing cre- ative work, adventure and family. Jeremy Jensen will talk about finding flow — an optimal state of consciousness in which we feel the most alive — and end with an invigorating bike ride up Prince Creek. The Stio Adventure Filmmakers Pitch Event takes place Saturday afternoon. The inaugural event features seven finalists (out of over 40 entries) pitching their concept to a jury to win $15,000 and premiere their film at 5Point’s 2023 festival. 

A free ice cream social with Sundae’s small-batch artisan ice cream takes place Saturday from 12:30-2:30 p.m., after the Family Film Program. 

A shot from Tom Attwater’s Attack and Release which details the life of fly fisherman Ranga Perera. (photo courtesy of Tom Attwater)
A shot from Tom Attwater’s Attack and Release which details the life of fly fisherman Ranga Perera. (photo courtesy of Tom Attwater)

FILM HIGHLIGHTS 

5Point Film Festival’s screenings strive to ignite personal and communal adventure through meaningful storytelling. It was founded on the philosophy that communities improve when residents “pursue adventure and intentionally live their own best story.” Every film revolves around the importance of human connection, while 

imparting profound stories through stunning cinematography.
Feature films tell stories of overcoming one of the most traumatic accidents in the history of rock climbing (“An Accidental Life”), living with a brain tumor and kayaking unprecedented whitewater (“The River Runner”) and themes of death and recovery (“Torn”). 

World premieres feature storm chasing, extreme mountain biking, rock climbing and fly-fishing.
“Their inspiration, creativity, pure joy, incredible athleticism and the sheer entertainment of (all) these programs will recharge you,” Yllanes said. “We’re known to push the limits of what people consider outdoor adventure films.” 

CONTINUAL OUTREACH 

5Point Film Festival is named for its value-based mission, which centers around the five points: Respect for humans, the environment and experience; Commitment to overcome fear and lead a vital existence; Humility to listen to intuition, not ego; Purpose in pursuing one’s highest aspirations even in the face of adversity; and Balance of maintaining focus and energy in life and nature while surrendering to the uncontrollable. 

Scott Lindgren takes the plunge in Rush Sturges’ award-winning film The River Runner. Join Sturges for a Q&A after the 5Point screening on Saturday, April 23. (photo courtesy of Eric Parker)
Scott Lindgren takes the plunge in Rush Sturges’ award-winning film The River Runner. Join Sturges for a Q&A after the 5Point screening on Saturday, April 23. (photo courtesy of Eric Parker)

In addition to the annual film festival, 5Point sponsors Dream Project scholarships, which encourage young people to chase their dreams to better the world through a $1,500 scholarship; the 5Point Film Fund, which supports filmmakers and artists; and the free 5Point Student Film Reel, which provides inspirational films for all students and an accompanying resource packet for educators in the Roaring Fork Valley. 

5Point is also expanding its programming year- round to continue to inspire audiences locally and along the Front Range. Through regular programming, 5Point hopes to “have people realize that these are such important points to live by,” Yllanes said. “You’re really taking a step to live a purposeful life. The last two years have challenged us both mentally and physically . 

“With the return of our in-person festival, we continue to champion the creative and authentic stories that 5Point has become known for. Great storytelling is our anchoring source of inspiration and hope in a constantly shifting world.” 

5Point Film Festival returns in person

If you go

What: 5Point Film Festival

When: April 21-24

Where: Various venues in Carbondale

Cost: $365 pass or ala carte pricing from $15-$38

More info: www.5pointfilm.org

Brought to you by 5Point Film Festival

Once again, 5Point Film Festival is fostering a sense of community through a shared love of the outdoors. While the festival went virtual during the pandemic, it’s back and stronger than ever this year, featuring a lineup of 56 short and feature-length films. 

“It’s so important to reconnect the audience and the community through the in-person festival. It’s our biggest priority,” said Luis Yllanes, executive director of 5Point Film Festival. “The magic that makes this organization so special is the ability to connect and gather in person.” 

Professional climber Beth Rodden tackling a boulder problem in Yosemite. Rodden features in 5Point premiere This Is Beth. (photo courtesy of Tara Kerzhner)
Professional climber Beth Rodden tackling a boulder problem in Yosemite. She is featured in the 5Point premiere of This Is Beth. (photo courtesy of Tara Kerzhner)

Inspiration through connection

The four-day film festival focuses on inspiring audiences through outdoor films, panel discussions, art, music, food, and activities, like a fly-casting competition, bike ride and run and hike event. Over 50 special guests, featuring filmmakers and their subjects to writers and athletes, will attend the festival. 

The festival offers just about something for everyone, from young and older filmmakers to families, nature lovers and af- ter-party revelers. 

It all kicks off Thursday April 21 with the Van Life Rally featuring tricked- out adventure vehicles, live music and food trucks, late night tacos and more. 

Free panels and workshops encompass a variety of topics, from increasing diver- sity in outdoor films to balancing cre- ative work, adventure and family. Jeremy Jensen will talk about finding flow — an optimal state of consciousness in which we feel the most alive — and end with an invigorating bike ride up Prince Creek. The Stio Adventure Filmmakers Pitch Event takes place Saturday afternoon. The inaugural event features seven finalists (out of over 40 entries) pitching their concept to a jury to win $15,000 and premiere their film at 5Point’s 2023 festival. 

A free ice cream social with Sundae’s small-batch artisan ice cream takes place Saturday from 12:30-2:30 p.m., after the Family Film Program.

A shot from Tom Attwater's Attack and Release which details the life of fly fisherman Ranga Perera. (photo courtesy of Tom Attwater)
A shot from Tom Attwater’s Attack and Release which details the life of fly fisherman Ranga Perera. (photo courtesy of Tom Attwater)

Film highlights

5Point Film Festival’s screenings strive to ignite personal and communal adventure through meaningful storytelling. It was founded on the philosophy that communities improve when residents “pursue adventure and intentionally live their own best story.” Every film revolves around the importance of human connection, while 

imparting profound stories through stunning cinematography.
Feature films tell stories of overcoming one of the most traumatic accidents in the history of rock climbing (“An Accidental Life”), living with a brain tumor and kayaking unprecedented whitewater (“The River Runner”) and themes of death and recovery (“Torn”). World premieres feature storm chasing, extreme mountain biking, rock climbing and fly-fishing.
“Their inspiration, creativity, pure joy, incredible athleticism and the sheer entertainment of (all) these programs will recharge you,” Yllanes said. “We’re known to push the limits of what people consider outdoor adventure films.”

Continual outreach

5Point Film Festival is named for its value-based mission, which centers around the five points: Respect for humans, the environment and experience; Commitment to overcome fear and lead a vital existence; Humility to listen to intuition, not ego; Purpose in pursuing one’s highest aspirations even in the face of adversity; and Balance of maintaining focus and energy in life and nature while surrendering to the uncontrollable.

Scott Lindgren takes the plunge in Rush Sturges' award-winning film The River Runner. Join Sturges for a Q&A after the 5Point screening on Saturday, April 23. (photo courtesy of Eric Parker)
Scott Lindgren takes the plunge in Rush Sturges’ award-winning film The River Runner. Join Sturges for a Q&A after the 5Point screening on Saturday, April 23. (photo courtesy of Eric Parker)

In addition to the annual film festival, 5Point sponsors Dream Project scholarships, which encourage young people to chase their dreams to better the world through a $1,500 scholarship; the 5Point Film Fund, which supports filmmakers and artists; and the free 5Point Student Film Reel, which provides inspirational films for all students and an accompanying resource packet for educators in the Roaring Fork Valley. 

5Point is also expanding its programming year- round to continue to inspire audiences locally and along the Front Range. Through regular programming, 5Point hopes to “have people realize that these are such important points to live by,” Yllanes said. “You’re really taking a step to live a purposeful life. The last two years have challenged us both mentally and physically . 

“With the return of our in-person festival, we continue to champion the creative and authentic stories that 5Point has become known for. Great storytelling is our anchoring source of inspiration and hope in a constantly shifting world.”

Choosing health

Next Cooking Matter classes:

Begins March 2, 5:30-7:30 p.m. Wednesdays. Free six-week course.

Location: Changing Lifestyles Classroom, 501 Airport Road, Rifle, CO

Sign up: 970-625-6200 or email jcollinge@grhd.org

For more information on all of Grand River Health’s lifestyle programs, visit: www.grandriverhealth.org.

Making healthy choices can transform your life, but doing it alone can be an uphill battle. That’s why the Health Education Team at Grand River Health in Rifle offers classes and support. From diabetes education and new-mom support groups to cooking classes, Grand River Health breaks down healthy lifestyle habits into small, digestible chunks.

Diabetes Prevention and Management

Diabetes can seem overwhelming, but Grand River Health’s programs help both kids and adults take a proactive approach.

Their Diabetes Management program guides recently diagnosed patients, as well as those who simply need help staying on track.

“People who come to see us are satisfied. Some find that their diabetes does ‘reverse’ with weight control, healthy eating, and exercise. Their bodies are still able to make and use insulin, and their blood sugar levels go back to normal. Their diabetes is in remission” said Jenna Collinge, health educator at Grand River Health. “We take lifestyle changes one step at a time, making sure they take their medications properly and eat the proper amount of carbohydrates and get preventative care like foot checks and eye exams.”

Grand River Health’s two-year Diabetes Prevention program is aimed at people who have pre-diabetes. It focuses on preventing type 2 diabetes through healthy eating habits and sharing recipes and tips for increasing physical activity and managing stress.

Before the program, Tim Enfinger tried a lot of different diets, but nothing stuck. His dad had Type 2 diabetes, so when Enfinger’s hands began tingling, he joined the online Diabetes Prevention program.

Diabetes can seem overwhelming, but Grand River Health’s programs help both kids and adults take a proactive approach. (photo courtesy of Grand River Health)
Diabetes can seem overwhelming, but Grand River Health’s programs help both kids and adults take a proactive approach. (photo courtesy of Grand River Health)

“My favorite thing about the video series was the folks were very similar to me,” he said. “My coach was awesome. If I had a question, she would always respond. I was pretty much your standard couch potato before the program. Now my wife and I go walking every day. I feel a lot better. I sleep better, and I’m more confident.”

Through the program, some participants who incorporated exercise and lifestyle modifications lost 10-20 pounds after six months, Collinge said.

For kids, Pediatric Diabetes Management provides pediatric telehealth from Barbara Davis Center clinic every second Friday of the month. To schedule an appointment, call (303) 724-2323.

Cooking Matters

Learning how to shop on a budget, read labels, price compare and prepare inexpensive meals can enhance your wallet and health.

Cooking Matters, a free six-week course, teaches participants to identify healthy food options and portion sizes, plan menus, shop smart and prepare quick and easy snacks and meals. Each week, people receive a bag of groceries and share meals they’ve prepared.

“Some people who start off don’t eat vegetables, but they find out they like certain fruits and vegetables,” Collinge said. “It opens their eyes to other food options, and a lot of people have cut their grocery bills almost in half.”

Cooking Matters, a free six-week course, teaches participants to identify healthy food options and portion sizes, plan menus, shop smart and prepare quick and easy snacks and meals. Each week, people receive a bag of groceries and share meals they’ve prepared. (photo courtesy of Grand River Health)
Cooking Matters, a free six-week course, teaches participants to identify healthy food options and portion sizes, plan menus, shop smart and prepare quick and easy snacks and meals. Each week, people receive a bag of groceries and share meals they’ve prepared. (photo courtesy of Grand River Health)

Even when people only have microwaves, the Cooking Matters team shows them how to eat healthy microwave meals. They also teach people how to add nutrients to inexpensive noodles, like ramen, by adding canned or frozen vegetables.

Cooking Matters also encourages community bonding; participants often continue to meet to cook or take walks together.

In addition to Cooking Matters, Grand River Health hosts monthly weight loss, bariatric support and walking groups to help people with weight management.

Assisting moms

Parents play an essential role in their children’s health, which is why Grand River Health focuses on providing the best start possible.

Lactation services include free phone consultations and tips.

Meanwhile, Baby & Me, a free support group for new moms, meets  in person at 10 a.m. most Wednesdays and offers a private Facebook Group. Each session covers a different topic, from breastfeeding challenges or stages of development to local resources and creating joyful homes.

Parents play an essential role in their children’s health, which is why Grand River Health focuses on providing the best start possible. (photo courtesy of Grand River Health)
Parents play an essential role in their children’s health, which is why Grand River Health focuses on providing the best start possible. (photo courtesy of Grand River Health)

“It’s a way to get the caregiver out of the house and let the kids have interaction with one another and let caregivers chat about the challenges of parenting,” Collinge said.

Whether you’re challenged by diabetes, weight, kidney disease or hypertension or simply finding your way as a new parent, Grand River Health is here to help.

“Our number one priority is being our community’s first choice in healthcare and disease prevention,” Collinge said.

Integrated Mountain Group rejuvenates historic Glenwood landmark

Featuring Elms Building after renovation, photo courtesy of Integrated Mountain Group
Featuring Elms Building after renovation, photo courtesy of Integrated Mountain Group

For well over a century, Glenwood Springs has been viewed as an area with great healing potential; in 1903, Dr. W. F. Berry passed through the town and noticed the health resort possibilities it offered with a relatively mild climate and therapeutic mineral waters. He had already built a sanitarium in Michigan, and by 1906, he had moved to Glenwood Springs and constructed a huge hospital on 10th Street. There, doctors did everything from deliver babies to treat disease until 1937, when a businessman bought the building and converted it into an apartment complex. Today, that same building stands as the Elms Apartments, housing local residents.

Featuring Elms Building after renovation, photo courtesy of Integrated Mountain Group
Featuring Elms Building after renovation, photo courtesy of Integrated Mountain Group

Local management and real estate firm Integrated Mountain Group has managed the property since the company’s founding in 2017. They know that maintaining buildings — and restoring historic properties to their prior splendor — adds to the health and wellbeing of a community, both aesthetically and financially. So, last summer, in partnership with the building’s owner, they began the extensive process of renovating the four-level, historic Elms Apartments.

“Glenwood Springs is a small community, and this is a large historic building that’s very visible. It’s part of the fabric of our historic town, and it helps define the town,” said Integrated Mountain co-founder Scott Key. Glenwood Springs has a lot of culture and history, and certainly, a lot of people don’t want to lose that.”

Featuring Elms Building after renovation, photo courtesy of Integrated Mountain Group
Featuring Elms Building after renovation, photo courtesy of Integrated Mountain Group

The Integrated Mountain Management and Maintenance team began transforming the 22-unit apartment complex on the corner of 10th and Bennett by giving it an exterior facelift. Renovation started with new energy efficient windows and doors.

Work expanded to the 14,000 square feet of exterior siding and then moved to the interior with new carpeting throughout, among other upgrades. A palette of warm tones was chosen for the final paint, brightening the formerly weathered-white building.

Featuring Elms Building before renovation, photo courtesy of Integrated Mountain Group
Featuring Elms Building before renovation, photo courtesy of Integrated Mountain Group

Of course, any remodeling project — much less a historic one — has its challenges.

“It was a team effort between our property managers and the full Integrated Mountain Maintenance team” said Suzanne Henry, Integrated Mountain Management leader and co-founder. “It’s an incredible structure, and the process often required more than a dozen staff and local contractors on site for many months. The result has given this historic building a fresh face and new lease on life, befitting this downtown residential location.”

The Elms renovation led not only to improved values for the building, but a positive impact on the neighboring properties and downtown area.

Featuring Elms Building before renovation, photo courtesy of Integrated Mountain Group
Featuring Elms Building before renovation, photo courtesy of Integrated Mountain Group

The Elms Apartments is the second major downtown renovation initiated by the Integrated Mountain Group on a downtown Glenwood historic landmark. The first involved the redesign and rebuild of the former Tamarack building on 10th and Grand, completed with DM Neuman in 2017. The re-christened Integrated Mountain Building now serves as the Glenwood Springs home for Integrated Mountain Properties, Management and Maintenance.

“The Elms renovation is a good example of our partnership and commitment to our customers and community. Since our founding, we have been a strong supporter of dozens of local organizations and non-profits, from education to youth empowerment, sports, and the arts,” said Bob Johnson, senior vice president and co-founder of Integrated Mountain Management. “It’s a wonderful heritage we are building, and the Elms is a very visual example.”

On Our Minds

On September 14, Renew Roaring Fork Assisted Living and Memory Care presents a trio of experts to discuss research, care and living with Alzheimer’s and dementia-related illnesses (Getty Images)
On September 14, Renew Roaring Fork Assisted Living and Memory Care presents a trio of experts to discuss research, care and living with Alzheimer’s and dementia-related illnesses (Getty Images)

Annabel Bowlen didn’t know much about Alzheimer’s Disease until 2012, when she had an encounter with her father Pat Bowlen, former owner and CEO of the Denver Broncos. “I was a student at CU Boulder and went home to study for finals. I thought my dad would be excited to see me. Instead, he was confused and upset I was there. This was very uncharacteristic for him, and I didn’t understand what was going on until my mother pulled me aside and told me.”

After graduation, Annabel dedicated herself to the care of her father, who died of Alzheimer’s related illness in 2019. Today she is now caring for her mother, also named Annabel, who, in a cruel, but increasingly more common twist of fate, was diagnosed with the same disease just a year before the death of her husband.

On Tuesday, Sept. 14, from 5-7 p.m. Annabel Bowlen, known as “Little Bell,” to her family and friends, will discuss what life is like as a caregiver to loved ones navigating this disease, and how caregivers can prevent burnout, in an upcoming Health Series talk at the Renew Roaring Fork Assisted Living and Memory Care center in Glenwood Springs.

The two-hour event, according to Lee Tuchfarber, CEO of Renew Senior Communities, is intended to give guests (both in-person and via webcast) new information in the research of Alzheimer’s disease and dementia-related illnesses.

“So many people are feeling helpless because there are no meaningful pharmaceuticals that exist to treat Alzheimer’s,” notes Tuchfarber. “This discussion will highlight some of the new areas of research that are non-traditional and very promising. It will leave people with hope.”

Joining Bowen in the talk are two representatives from the Knoebel Institute for Heathy Aging at the University of Denver, executive director Dr. Lotta Granholm-Bentley and Dr. Eric Chess, founder and director of the Paul Freeman Financial Security Program at DU.

Dr. Granholm-Bentley has been working with Alzheimer’s disease for 30 years, focusing on new methods of early detection.

“What we look at is not just developing new medication, but how lifestyle changes can be effective in preventing or slowing down the progression of Alzheimer’s,” she says. These include moderate exercise, stress reduction and a “Blue Zones” diet focused on Mediterranean nutrition. “These lifestyle changes are able to cut down the risk of Alzheimer’s by at least 50 percent,” she says. “Eating salmon three times a week increases lifespan by five years.”

One of the key advantages of the work being done at the Knoebel Institute is the cross-disciplinary studies that University of Denver provides. From social work, to business, to psychology, the study of Alzheimer’s disease and its eventual cure, Dr. Granholm-Bentley believes, will depend on several disciplines working together, in addition to healthcare, to find a way forward. Speaking to this component of Alzheimer’s research at the Glenwood event is Dr. Eric Chess, who’s research focuses on a specific, and surprising, early indicator of cognitive decline – financial decision making.

“The earliest cognitive indicator — impaired financial decision making – is often shown decades before any other symptoms,” says Dr. Chess. “Often it’s not the doctors, but certified financial planners, banks and credit card companies that see these decisions that don’t make sense. It’s here we see the earliest signs because financial decision making encompasses a wide array of cognitive tasks — risk assessment, personal implications, decision making, It’s a lot more than the math. You are using a lot of different parts of your brain, simultaneously.”

JOIN RENEW AND ANNABEL BOWLEN, ON SEPTEMBER 14

What: “Promising New Alzheimer’s Research”

When: September 14, 5-7 p.m.

Where: Renew Roaring Fork, Assisted Living and Memory Care, 2800 Midland Ave., Glenwood Springs

Speakers: Lotta Granholm-Bentley, Ph.D, Eric Chess, MD, JD and Annabel Bowlen

For in-person attendance registration, call (720) 679-5528. Event will be held outdoors. Proof of vaccination must be shown at the door. For webinar registration, visit www.renewsenior.com

Holy Cross Energy’s journey toward 100% renewable energy

HCE former CEO Ed Grange. To learn more about Ed’s story, visit HolyCross.com/the-co-op-that-climbed-mountains/
Holy Cross Energy’s Journey to 100%

Learn more about our Journey to 100% at www.holycross.com/100×30.

At Holy Cross Energy (HCE), our legacy remains rooted in the original ranchers and farmers who called our valleys home in the late 1930s. It is because of their commitment to bring electricity to the Eagle and Roaring Fork River Valleys that we are able to provide safe, reliable, affordable, and sustainable energy and services for our members and their communities today. As HCE embarks on its ambitious goal to bring 100% renewable energy to our members and communities by 2030, we honor our remarkable past.

Thank you for being part of our Journey to 100%.

Below, former HCE CEO Ed Grange discusses how bringing electricity to a new ski area called Vail in the 1950s almost didn’t happen:

This article originally appeared in Rural Electric Magazine in November 2020. Written by Frank Gallant.

Ed Grange grew up on an unelectrified ranch high in the Rocky Mountains of western Colorado. He watched his mother pump water by hand and cook on a wood stove. Late in life, he could still hear the “god-awful” noise made by the gasoline-powered washing machine on the front porch.

“In the winter, we had to bring it into the kitchen and run the exhaust pipe outside. The noise filled the house,” he recalled in a March 2019 newspaper interview.

Grange didn’t want that kind of a life for himself, so with his Italian immigrant parents’ blessing, he went to college and then graduate school, expecting to get a job teaching mathematics.

Then the direction of his life changed. Home for the summer in 1950, he took a part-time $1.15-an-hour job with Holy Cross Electric Association that grew into a 60-year career.

Vail, the early years

Holy Cross Electric emerged in 1939 after the federal Rural Electrification Administration (REA) recommended that two groups of farmers and ranchers who wanted to organize a co-op—one from the Eagle River Valley in Vail and the other from the Roaring Fork Valley in Aspen—band together if they hoped to get a loan. A county extension agent suggested the incorporators name the co-op after the Mount of the Holy Cross, a local landmark.

REA approved a loan for $119,000, and Holy Cross Electric started building lines in the two valleys. The first line was energized in September 1941, bringing the comforts of central station power to 175 rural families.

By the time Grange came along, Holy Cross Electric was expanding up side valleys and along the main streets of mountain villages in both directions. The acquisition of two small utilities, Eagle River Electric Company and Mountain Utilities, further enlarged the co-op’s service territory.

Then around 1962, the ski industry—and the co-op—took off like a downhill racer. Aspen, Vail, Snowmass, Buttermilk, and other ski resorts were developed. Holy Cross Electric nearly quadrupled in size between 1962 and 1971, growing from 2,300 consumers to 8,700.

Grange saw the boom coming in the late 1950s when many resorts still used noisy diesel engines to power ski lifts. He noticed that a number of large sheep ranches near what would become Vail had changed hands, from the original local owners to a Denver-based buyer named Transmontane Rod and Gun Club. This didn’t make sense because back then, no one bought land in Gore Valley for hunting and fishing preserves.

He investigated and discovered that Transmontane Rod and Gun Club was a front for an investment group headed by Pete Seibert, a former U.S. Ski Team member, and Earl Eaton, a local mountaineer, who wanted to build a world-class ski resort.

Vail Gondola, 1962

“Seibert and Eaton knew that if they said they were planning to build a ski area, land prices would soar,” Grange told the Post Independent in Glenwood Springs, where the co-op has its headquarters. “So over the next few years, they acquired practically all of the land from the bottom of Vail Pass down to where Vail exists now. Some parcels were hard to get because some ranchers didn’t want to sell, but Seibert and Eaton eventually got everything.”

Busy running a growing utility, Grange and his boss, cigar-chomping George Thurston, Holy Cross Electric’s first general manager, didn’t pay much attention until they started seeing publicity about the new ski area. One day in April or May 1962, Seibert drove down to Glenwood Springs to talk to them.

He said Public Service of Colorado officials had laughed him out of their offices. They said his plan was a pipe dream; Gore Valley was too far from Denver to attract enough skiers to keep him in business.

“So Pete tells us, ‘I don’t have any more money. I spent most of what I had on the gondola. … Could you give me some help? Could you take it to your board and see if maybe they would be willing to build me a line up there so I could get open? Our targeted opening day is December 15th.”

All seven board members were ranchers. They didn’t know much about skiing, let alone big ski resorts. But they trusted their general manager’s judgment when he said the co-op shouldn’t pass up this opportunity to build membership in Gore Valley. Grange said it was clear to him Thurston would be out looking for work if the project flopped.

Both Thurston and Grange gulped when Siebert said, a few days later, “You’ve got to put everything underground that serves the lodges and the housing.”

Snowmaking in Vail

Holy Cross Electric had only scant experience with underground construction—one subdivision in Aspen. The co-op hired an outside engineer to lay out the distribution system and an outside contractor to build the overhead lines to the lifts.

Fortunately, 1962 was a dry year and not as cold as usual, allowing the work to proceed without delays.

“We just barely made the December 15th opening day deadline,” Grange said.

There was little snow at first and few skiers, but a few weeks later, the mountain got into its January rhythm of adding a few inches almost every day, and Vail was on its way.

“Never in the history of U.S. skiing has a bare mountain leaped in such a short time into the four-star category of ski resorts,” Sports Illustrated said of Siebert and Eaton’s dream in 1964, when Vail was becoming one of the most popular snow-sports destinations in the United States, welcoming thousands of visitors to its slopes every winter.

When Ed Grange went to work for Holy Cross Electric in 1950, seven employees served 700 consumers. Today, 158 employees serve more than 55,000, from major ski areas to farms, ranches, and rural communities.

Grange retired in 2011. Colorado Country Life, the statewide co-op magazine, reported he was still skiing in 2019 at age 84, though he no longer made the rounds to the ski areas to read the meters on the lifts, a task he happily completed into the mid-1990s.

Pros and cons of buying an electric vehicle in 2020 vs. 2021

Tesla’s electric vehicles (such as this Model 3) have long set the pace in the EV market, and they enjoy their own network of charging stations.
Credit: Benjamin Westby

With electric vehicles gaining market share and popularity, Colorado consumers are increasingly faced with tradeoffs. One such tradeoff presents itself this month as a key state tax credit is set to decrease significantly after Dec. 31.

The dilemma boils down to this: Buy an electric vehicle (EV) before the end of the year to save an extra $1,500? Or hold off until 2021, when a host of new models – including some electric trucks and SUVs – are expected to hit the market?

That’s because Colorado’s “Innovative Motor Vehicle” income tax credit, currently pegged at $4,000 on the purchase of a new plug-in hybrid or all-electric vehicle, will drop to $2,500 in 2021. Likewise, the credit for leasing an EV will decrease to $1,500 from the current $2,000.

There’s some consternation among EV advocates about the imminent reduction of the state’s tax incentive, but Stefan Johnson, transportation program manager at Clean Energy Economy for the Region (CLEER), sees both sides. 

“It’s not ideal having the tax credit step down just as we’re starting to see more models come onto the market in Colorado,” he says. “If I could wave a magic wand, I’d give folks another year to take advantage of the $4,000. But on the other hand, we all need a deadline to get us to act.”

The importance of tax credits

In addition to the state tax credit, new EV buyers can also claim a federal tax credit of up to $7,500. However, Johnson notes, results may vary: Tesla and GM vehicles are no longer eligible for the federal tax credit, and in the case of other vehicles the size of the credit will depend on the individual’s tax liability. The state tax credit applies to all models, and everyone gets the full $4,000 regardless of their tax situation.

“I definitely think the tax credits go a long way to moving the EVs,” says Tim Jackson, president and CEO of the Colorado Auto Dealers Association. 

Electric vehicles are expected to reach “price parity” with gas cars in the next five years or so, but for now, Jackson says, they need subsidies to make up the difference. He points to what happened when the state of Georgia suddenly ended its $5,000 EV tax credit in 2016 – EV sales plummeted by 80%.

Other incentives to buy EVs

But tax credits aren’t the only incentive to buy an EV. Some manufacturers are offering pretty hefty discounts on certain models, and local dealerships are offering extra deals of their own to make room for next year’s models. 

Added up, the breaks can make a big difference, says Michael Payne Sr., owner of Mountain Chevy in Glenwood Springs. For example, he explains that the Colorado tax credit plus GM’s manufacturer discount takes $15,000 off the price of a Chevy Bolt, putting it in the same range as a comparable gas car.

Barriers to putting more electric cars on the road

The state of Colorado has set an ambitious goal of getting 940,000 electric cars on the road by 2030 – a seemingly impossible task given that the current number is fewer than 30,000. Christian Williss, Senior Director for Transportation Fuel and Technology at the Colorado Energy Office, sees four barriers to achieving it:

  1. High upfront costs
  2. Lack of public awareness about EVs
  3. Lagging charging infrastructure
  4. Limited model availability

The state tax credit was designed to tackle barrier number one, but Williss says that policy can only do so much given barriers number two, three and four.

According to Williss, surveys have found that the majority of Coloradans have little knowledge of electric vehicles – and fewer still know about the state tax credit. He says the state plans to launch a multi-year education campaign next year to increase awareness about EVs.

As for charging infrastructure – that is, charging stations – state grant programs have been fueling a steady expansion of the network in the past couple of years, thanks in part to funding from a national legal settlement over Volkswagen’s diesel emissions scandal. (CLEER manages one of those grant programs in 14 counties across northwestern Colorado.) Xcel Energy has plans to add to the spree with a big spend of its own starting in 2021.

And the final barrier – limited model availability – is in the process of falling, thanks to Colorado’s 2019 adoption of California’s Zero Emissions Vehicle (ZEV) mandate. With that move, Colorado has in effect joined a common EV market with California and nine other states, with the result that the range of EV models sold in Colorado is expected to grow rapidly in 2021 and beyond.

The dilemma faced by prospective EV buyers right now

If a subcompact EV like a Chevy Bolt or Nissan Leaf fits your lifestyle, there’s every reason to buy now and score a great deal, says Williss. Just know that your choices will be limited to cars that are already on the lot, because any car that you order at this point probably won’t be delivered by Dec. 31. 

Meanwhile, Western Slope drivers who have been holding out for something beefier should set their sights on 2021, when a number of all-electric SUVs, crossovers and trucks are expected to make their debut.

CLEER’s Johnson thinks the new crop of EVs are positioned to make bigger inroads in the Colorado market. 

“Many Coloradans are environmentally conscious and want to do the right thing, but AWD and high clearance aren’t just optional features for them,” he says. “Having new models that are compatible with the outdoor Colorado lifestyle will be a game-changer for EV sales in the state.”

At the compact/crossover end of the SUV class, Ford is supposed to start delivering its much-anticipated Mustang Mach-E any day now. The new all-electric Mustang can drive 230 miles between charges and has a base price of about $44,000, before factoring in any state or federal-tax credits. 

Another crossover that’s eagerly anticipated is VW’s ID.4. Basically an electric updating of the Tiguan – and a likely competitor to the Tesla Model Y – the ID.4 has a 250-mile range and starts at $41,000. The rear-wheel-drive version will come out first in mid-2021, followed by an AWD later in the year.

Other crossover EVs worth looking out for in the coming year include Hyundai’s Kona Electric, Nissan’s Ariya and Cadillac’s high-end Lyriq. As for Colorado favorite Subaru, its plug-in hybrid Crosstrek should start selling in our state in 2021, but an all-electric Subaru remains unavailable anywhere.

Electric pickup trucks

Perhaps the most buzz-worthy development of 2021 promises to be the introduction of EV pickup trucks, such as the Rivian R1T.
Credit: Jeff Johnson

Perhaps the most buzz-worthy development of 2021 promises to be the introduction of EV pickup trucks from Rivian, Ford and Tesla. The Rivian R1T is expected by the middle of the year, sporting a 300-plus-mile range and a max payload of 1,750 pounds – and a $67,500 price tag. Tesla says its Cybertruck will carry a 3,500-pound payload and come with features like cold-rolled steel and armor glass, all for an incredible base price of just under $40,000. 

Less is known at this stage about Ford’s electric F-150, but given the brand’s icon status it promises to become a major player. To round out the electric truck field, look for additional entrants from startups Lordstown and Bollinger.

Are electric vehicles becoming mainstream?

“I have a very, very positive outlook for 2021,” says Jon Fruend, general manager of Audi Volkswagen Glenwood Springs. He sees EVs finally becoming mainstream, as Volkswagen and Audi, like many other manufacturers, will finally be offering electric models in every major class.

“I think what all the conventional manufacturers have to do is find a sweet spot of range versus price. I think they’ve got the models right. It’s finding that sweet spot. Is it 250 miles per charge? We’ll see.”