Chomp’s Deli settles in at Sixth Street site in Glenwood Springs | PostIndependent.com

Chomp’s Deli settles in at Sixth Street site in Glenwood Springs

The Chomp's Deli sign, and the restaurant itself, has moved up Sixth Street in Glenwood Springs to the space formerly occupied by Polanka.
Geneane Lazo

Recently, Chomp’s Delicatessen reopened its doors in a brand new location, still under the same ownership and with an unchanged menu.

After the owner of the former Chomps building at 172 W. Sixth St. — soon to house The Station Medical and Recreation Dispensary — advised Chomp’s Deli owner Steve Fuleki that the day he already knew was imminent had arrived, Chomp’s almost bit off more than it could chew.

“In May of 2018, I got a notice from the new owner that sooner or later I would have to move because he had no intentions of leasing the property to a restaurant,” Fuleki said.

“He’s a super guy. He is a really nice guy,” Fuleki said. “He is going to have a weed shop, end of story.”

“Nothing has changed except the location.”— Steve Fuleki, Chomp’s Deli owner

“He was very fair … not mish-mashing,” he added. “He was not like, ‘Oh, I don’t know, maybe, talk to me in a month.’ No, he told me from the get go, ‘Steve, I am not interested in leasing this place to a restaurant, so, you will have to get out … eventually.’

“And, I told him I appreciate it. I appreciate your candor, and I am going to try to move sooner rather than later, because it would just be easier on everybody,” Fuleki said of his own intentions to keep the popular sandwich shop going.

The new property search, though, proved challenging, as most of Glenwood Springs’ real estate market offered old office buildings in need of costly, $100,000 plus, renovations, according to Fuleki.

“If not more,” the Chomp’s owner explained.

However, when Polanka packed up and reopened shop in Rifle, Chomp’s quickly took over the former Polish restaurant’s site, which already had many of the necessary restaurant code requirements in place.

Not long after, Chomp’s Delicatessen’s started calling 216 B Sixth Street its new home.

Polanka had said that the ongoing impacts from the Grand Avenue Bridge construction, and the unsettled state of Sixth Street, had impacted their business, prompting the move.

“God bless them,” Fuleki said. “I wish them luck, and we have had a little luck even when [Polanka] became available, because otherwise there would have been no Chomp’s.”

According to Fuleki, Chomp’s had its regulars who expressed disappointment when the staple, located in the heart of Glenwood’s restaurant row, almost had to close its doors, for good.

But the restaurant’s faithful also let out a sigh of relief when they heard the news that Chomp’s was moving just right up the street.

“We were actually moving the week of Labor Day,” he said. “It took us three days, and of course there was no way I could do this by myself. The staff helped because they ran the everyday business at the old location.

“But it had to be done. It’s either that or you quit. There were two options,” he said.

With a staff to take care of, as well as demand among locals and tourists alike, Fuleki successfully juggled paying double rent in the Roaring Fork Valley as a small business owner.

“Nothing has changed except the location,” Fuleki said.

Practically next door to the pedestrian bridge and the adjacent parcel of city-owned land whose fate still remains in question, Chomp’s owner said of the open space, “I heard they were thinking about setting up a park, with water fountains and picnic tables and chairs; and of course if they do that, Chomp’s would fit in like a glove.”

City Councilor Jim Ingraham even offered an endorsement at the last City Council meeting, when he commented during the marijuana shop hearing, “I was a frequent visitor to Chomp’s … the sandwiches were fantastic.”

mabennett@postindependent.com


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